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Get Compensation with a Traumatic Brain Injury Lawyer

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The technical name for a serious head injury may be mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), but make no mistake; mTBIs are rarely “mild” in prognosis. The problem is that mTBIs are closed-head injuries with sometimes delayed onsets, which means that many car accident victims might not even realize their injury. So if you’ve been in a motor vehicle accident, a traumatic brain injury lawyer will tell you to seek medical attention immediately because an early diagnosis can significantly aid your recovery process.

 

Diagnosing and Assessing mTBI

 

Medical professionals know the seriousness of mTBI and the potential risks involved in a missed diagnosis. In fact, according to the Ontario Neurotrauma Foundation’s Guidelines for mTBI and Persistent Symptoms, providing the right information and follow-up instructions about mTBI symptoms is one of the most effective strategies for preventing persistent post mTBI symptoms. Here are some risk factors that doctors look for when assessing mTBI:

  • Medical Factors
    • Post-traumatic amnesia;
    • History of previous traumatic brain injury;
    • High number of symptoms reported after the injury;
    • Skull fracture;
    • Early onset of pain, particularly headaches (i.e. within 24 hours of the injury or sooner);
    • Balance problems or dizziness; and
    • Nausea.
  • Contextual Factors
    • Injuries come from an automobile accident;
    • Presence of life stressors during the time of the injury;
    • Older age; and
    • Lack of social supports.

Of course, a traumatic brain injury lawyer cannot provide the knowledge of a trained doctor. If you’ve been in a car accident, make sure to see a doctor or go to the hospital before contacting a traumatic brain injury lawyer. Once you’re safe though, you’ll need the support of a Toronto personal injury lawyer; look for a free consultation with Sokoloff personal injury lawyers.

 

Source:

http://onf.org/system/attachments/60/original/Guidelines_for_Mild_Traumatic_Brain_Injury_and_Persistent_Symptoms.pdf